Category Archives: Summer

Covered Bridges of Lancaster County

Covered bridges are an iconic symbol that bring to mind a more simple time, a more simple way of life. Pennsylvania has approximately 219 covered bridges that have withstood the test of time, more than any other state. Lancaster boasts over 25 of those bridges, each with its own unique story.

The purpose of the covering is to protect the wooden structural members from the weather. Uncovered wooden bridges have a life span of only 10-15 years because of the effects of rain and sun. Thanks to the covering, we have many bridges that have been around a long time.

The longest covered bridge at 5,960 feet once spanned the Susquehanna River from Columbia to neighboring Wrightsville in York County. Built in 1814, it was unfortunately destroyed by high water and ice in 1832. But, many others remain, ready for you to discover and enjoy.

We’ve developed five driving tours of covered bridges in Lancaster County. For a PDF version, click here. If you prefer to use our Google Map tours, click here and choose the tour that most interests you. To learn more about our covered bridges, be sure to stop the Discover Lancaster Visitors Center to purchase the book, Covered Bridges of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

covered_bridges

A Day of River Therapy

I love the Susquehanna River, but I don’t spend as much time on or near it as I should, considering how close to home it is. One Saturday evening, I set out to remedy that by going on a Chiques Rock Outfitters’ 5:00 pm “Therapy Float.”

The Therapy Float is a guided trip on the Susquehanna River from the southern end of Marietta down to River Park in Columbia, where I parked my car at the Chiques Rock Outfitters rental shop.

I was equipped with a solo kayak, paddle, life jacket, and dry box for my camera. When we put our boats in the water, there were no others in sight, but we did spot a great blue heron fishing off a rock not far from shore. My guide, Ranae Tibbens, co-owner of Chiques Rock Outfitters, gave me a refresher on how to steer since it had been at least twenty years since I’d last been in a kayak. Then we were off to explore the river.

We paddled under the railroad bridge, where Chiques Creek empties into the river, to take a look at the water level and a new pedestrian bridge. As we headed out to the middle of the river, a bald eagle came swooping down over the water.  He came close enough overhead to be seen in detail, but I was too slow getting my camera out of the dry box to be able to get a good shot of him. He was very shortly joined by another, and we watched the two of them fly circles above the river and the shoreline for a few minutes, before flying away.

Getting out of the kayak during the trip is not only acceptable, it’s encouraged. We pulled up on an exposed stretch of pebbles, then waded out to a rock to examine someone’s 100+ year old script signature etched into the surface. We also examined the bore holes at the base of the rock, worn by the action of small pebbles in the current over time. Some rocks on the river seem to be more hole than rock, honeycombed by friction of stone and water. After taking photos from the top of the rock, we climbed down and waded back to our boats, thankful for the traction of water shoes on slippery rocks.

Shortly before sunset, we stopped at the boat launch by John Wright Restaurant for a few minutes then we took our time crossing to the other side of the river. We stopped often to take photographs of pink and orange light reflecting off of the bridge piers and the water.

When we pulled our boats in at the launch at River Park again, I was pleasantly exhausted and happy to have explored a couple of miles of the beautiful river in our backyard.

To learn about other water activities in Lancaster, click here.

Amish Farm and House

If you’re looking for fun and education in one great location, check out the Amish Farm and House on Lincoln Highway. Although you might pause when you arrive – because it shares a parking lot with a Target store and shopping plaza – once you step onto the property you’re transported from the hustle and bustle of today to another time… a time when life was simple. The juxtaposition helps you appreciate what Lancaster County once was (and portions still are), and how times have changed. This destination is great for all ages, and features all aspects of Amish life, including guided tours through a staged Amish home, school house, wood shop, blacksmith shop, pump house, and barnyard. You can try your skills on an Amish scooter, or take a buggy ride through the property and over a covered bridge. In the fall, there is a corn maze. You can also go the “extra mile” and take a bus tour through the local farm land.

Being an animal lover, and having two small children, I frequent this destination just to see the farmyard. Playful goats leap and bound through their play place, ducks and chickens roam freely, sheep, goats, donkeys, pigs, peacocks, and other livestock provide constant entertainment for youngsters and young-at-heart alike. Ironically, my son’s favorite place is the herb and vegetable garden, for no other reason than it’s paved with white rocks…. and at 1 ½ years old, white rocks are the Best. Thing. EVER. Don’t worry – I don’t let him take them home with us, but making him part with his handful of rocks is typically cause for a highly theatrical and slightly embarrassing baby meltdown. Luckily, the rocks are soon forgotten when we see the baby sheep just down the path.

In the wood shop, you can see a local wood carver making unique crafts. The smell of the wood shavings is earthy and inviting. Be sure to ask him about the giant sling shot he has attached to the top of his minivan! Maybe you’ll even get lucky and he’ll launch a water balloon over the farm for you. (He’s a local celebrity)

If you choose to participate in all the activities provided by the Amish Farm and house, you could spend several hours there… or, if you’re like me… you can enjoy a pleasant stroll around the barnyard in about 45 minutes, stop for a few “selfies” with the lamas, and still make it home for snacks and nap time. Whether you live near or far, this is a great destination and I highly recommend it.

Find Your Antique Treasures at Renningers

You never know what you’re going to find at Renninngers Antique Market in Denver PA, near Adamstown. The unpredictability is what keeps me coming back; there is something new every week. The maze-like antique market is home to over 600 vendors (indoor and outdoor). You’ll find typical war memorabilia, toys, bikes, maps, coins, sports memorabilia, and rugs as well as furniture and steampunk-inspired lamps.

It’s a picker’s paradise every Sunday at Renningers. The long aisles are filled with eye-catching antiques that will have you digging and exploring. If you have a specific item all the dealers are willing to direct you to where you can find it. The dealers are all very knowledgeable of their antiques as well as what others carry.

I am fascinated by antique furniture and the wide array of vintage clothes; that’s why I keep coming back. Also, the deals are great. My sister keeps coming back for the jewelry and materials to create new products (she’s a DIY fanatic). My Dad, well, he is there every Sunday to sell at his booth, Jeffrey Press Industrial, and he also purchases his items there for his original lamp creations. My brother is a history buff, so he’ll go for the military items, maps, and hardware. Finally, Mom goes for the vintage pottery (for her garden) and glassware. With a family full of makers, Renningers is our go-to place on Sundays.

12

Jeffrey Press Industrial |Summer 2015

When traveling to Renningers Antique Market, make sure to wear comfortable shoes (you’ll be walking around a lot). Another tip: bring cash! Most dealers only work with cash. Next, let your creativity flow. With the wave of DIY projects, antique and vintage materials are in high demand. Live a little and do something different with your next home project. Finally, get there early! A lot of the outdoor dealers only sell in the early morning so don’t miss out.

There are plenty of antiques and collectibles treasures each week at Renningers, so don’t just go once! Check it out a couple weekends out of the year and I am sure you will be taking antique treasures of your own home! The outdoor section is open Sunday 4:00 AM to 4:00 PM. The indoor section is open Sunday, 7:30 AM to 4:00 PM.


The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University.

Green Dragon: A Famous Friday Market

Driving down Rt. 272, you can’t miss the huge retro dragon perched above a sign that directs you to the Green Dragon Farmers Market and Auction. For more than 80 years it’s been a Lancaster County tradition for locals and visitors alike to spend their Fridays looking at 400 merchants, growers, and craftsmen on the 30 acre property.

Green Dragon has seven large market buildings, unique cottages, and outdoor vender tents. It offers both indoor and outdoor shopping experiences and a wide variety of products. From country cooking and produce to crystals and clothing, Green Dragon offers something for everyone. If you need a neat place to take your kids or if you’re hanging out with your friends and want to grab a bite to eat, check out Green Dragon.

What I like about Green Dragon is the diversity of products; it truly captures the essence of Lancaster. While inside, I enjoy walking around, watching people, and devouring a delicious sausage sandwich. Outside, my favorite cottages include: Hallelujah Hive (best honey you will ever try), India Moon Boutique (bohemian clothes and gemstone jewelry), All about Jerky (exotic jerkies from all different animals), and Cocalico Creek Country store (rustic chic).

Enjoy the spring and summer weather, plus get your exercise by walking through this unique place – all while soaking in the Lancaster County culture. You’ll discover something new each time you go!

Green Dragon is open from 9:00 AM to 9:00 PM every Friday.

The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University.

Scientific and Spectacular

The newly renovated North Museum of Nature and Science is a fascinating place for all ages. In my early 20’s, I was learning, having fun, and genuinely interested in the exhibits and collections. This space holds a new SciDome Theater, Nature Explorer Gallery, Nanotechnology exhibit, mineral collection and mid-Atlantic region bird collection.

Photography by Alysha Laird

Photography by Alysha Laird

As you walk into the North Museum, you are welcomed by their baby t-Rex and a massive globe displaying active weather patterns. To the right of the globe, you enter SciDome Theater, a touch digital system that projects high definition video and images onto a 41-foot aluminum dome. SciDome could be compared to a planetarium, but one difference is the type of shows. This theater expanded its programming to earth science shows to give guests a new experience on topics they would never have seen in a planetarium. Right now, SciDome is showing One World, One Sky: Big Bird’s Adventure, Super Volcanoes, and Magic Treehouse: Space Mission. The imagery in SciDome is astonishing; shows give real life perspectives in a movie-like experience. On June 20, SciDome will be presenting shows daily!

Photography by Alysha Laird

Photography by Alysha Laird

Past SciDome Theater, you enter the Nature Explorer Gallery, a combination of former Discovery Room and Live Animal Room. This gallery is filled with displays of unique shells, rocks, insects, and fossils. Children can examine different objects in nature like horns, furs, and space in the hands-on section of this gallery.

The most unique portion of this gallery is a tie between the bird call drum kit and the functioning beehive. The bird call drum kit collaborates creativity with nature. You might find your child has a hidden musical talent with this interactive piece! If you’re not a beekeeper, you don’t find yourself getting too close to beehives. With the functioning beehive display, you are able to examine how the bees interact and watch how they sustain the hive! To the left of the Nature Explorer Gallery, the Live Animal Room is occupied with unique reptiles, arachnids, and amphibians and with the help of the staff you can interact with these animals and learn more about them.

The nanotechnology exhibit is a small portion of the first floor but it is fascinating! This exhibit highlights the application of nanotechnology in our everyday life in basic terms. Past the nanotechnology exhibit is the featured Dinosaur Discoveries: Ancient Fossils, New Ideas. This exhibit is organized by American Museum of Natural History in collaboration with California Academy of Sciences, San Francisco, The Field Museum, Chicago, Houston Museum of Natural History, and North Carolina Museum of Natural Science. This exhibit will be on display until June 21.

The antique cabinet museum, displayed on the bottom floor, holds a large collection of male and female birds native to the Mid-Atlantic region. Past the aisles of cabinets is one of the largest mineral collections I have ever seen.

Photography by Alysha Laird

Photography by Alysha Laird

After this experience, I realized the North Museum holds innovative and cutting-edge technology and exhibits. From SciDome Theater to the bird call drum kit, live animal room, and the nanotechnology exhibit I was truly impressed. This museum would be great for a day trip with your kids. After the museum, kids can play in Buchanan Park.

The North Museum summer hours are listed below.

June 1 – August 31
Monday – Saturday:
10 am to 5 pm
Sunday:
12 noon to 5 pm

The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University.

 

The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University. – See more at: http://padutchcountryblog.com/#sthash.E0rTYOAa.dpuf
The author of this post, Julie Press, is currently the Marketing Intern at Discover Lancaster. She encompasses the Lancaster brand. Growing up in a farm house in Adamstown, she identifies with the rustic, homegrown feel Lancaster brings. Now relocated only minutes away from Lancaster City, she feels a strong connection to the City’s creativity, culture, and innovation. Julie studies Public Relations at Millersville University. – See more at: http://padutchcountryblog.com/#sthash.E0rTYOAa.dpu

An authentic Amish experience

For an authentic Amish experience that’s guaranteed to put a smile on the faces of the entire family, be sure to visit the Lil’ Country Store and Miniature Horse Farm. There’s nothing cuter than a miniature horse and even cuter yet is that right now (as I’m writing this in May) three of the tiny horses have newborn babies; with two more foals on the way! These creatures are friendly as they are adorable and as we walked through the barn, they poked their sweet noses through their stall doors to say hello. I couldn’t help but smile as my 1 ½ year old son squealed with delight as one foal nuzzled his hand.

The barn houses about 8 mini horses (not counting the foals), two full size horses, and in the nearby pasture are some playful goats. You can browse the barn on your own and spend time interacting with the horses, as well as seeing the pony carts, two Amish buggies, and the tack used to saddle and bridle the horses for riding. For young horse enthusiasts, a private pony ride is only $5.50 per child! And for a more hands-on experience, you can call ahead to reserve a private workshop session where you get brush a pony, ride them, feed them, and learn about horse care. The workshops generally last about an hour, and (parents beware!) are sure to be so fun that they’ll inspire your child to add a pony to their Christmas list. You can also elect to try a ride in the single or double pony cart which takes you on a ride through the farm to the dairy area. You’ll be happy to know that for safety reasons, no pony cart rides venture onto the main roads. Also, please note, the weight limit for riding these little guys is approximately 70lbs. There’s no age limit, but for my son, I decided to wait until next year to let him ride, since as a rambunctious little boy his idea of fun would probably be to dive off the poor unsuspecting horse into the mud! Oy-vay!

The best thing about this particular location is that it’s located at the home of Henry and Linda Stoltzfus, an Amish family who opened their property to the public in 2009. It’s “as real as it gets” here in Lancaster County. To get to the farm, you drive through rolling acres of corn and tobacco crops, and as we pulled our car in to the driveway, we were greeted by three Amish children who were playing in the front yard of the home. The Lil’ Country Store is in the garage of the property, and features handmade gifts and crafts, as well as a variety of baked goods and a fan-favorite,he home-made root beer. You can enjoy taste-testing locally made cheeses and potato chips, or satisfy your sweet tooth with a whoopie pie or locally made ice cream. There’s also a wood shop on the property, and you can observe the men working as they create beautiful hand made furniture and accessories that are available for sale in the shop.

Before leaving I couldn’t resist purchasing a lovely equestrian-inspired leather bracelet, which will always remind me of our fun visit to the miniature horse farm. So whether you’re visiting with children, or just want to feel like you’ve been behind the scenes on a real Amish Farm, be sure to add this destination to your vacation plans!

Visiting the Amish Village

When I was six years old, I couldn’t think of a better way to spend a Saturday afternoon than by hanging out with animals, especially horses. I jumped at any chance I got to see them. And of course, like most young kids, I loved learning about new things from a hands-on experience. Well I’m not a child anymore (though my older, wiser siblings might disagree with this), but as an Aunt to five wonderful nieces and nephews, I have the opportunity to see their faces light up when running around a playground or petting a live animal much like mine did at their age. So when I got the chance the visit the Amish Village, I thought it would be fun to take my oldest nephew, Silas, along for the ride!

Strolling through the Village

When we first arrived at the Amish Village, Silas and I were greeted by a friendly staff member who assisted us in a quick registration before directing us to the Village. We were free to explore many different buildings that are part of their Amish community. Silas thoroughly enjoyed feeding the horses and roosters in the barn. And I loved that we were free to visit each area of the Village at our own pace. There were always staff members available to answer any questions we had about a particular tool or building but no one made us feel rushed. Silas and I checked out a real Amish buggy and got an up-close look at Amish farm tools and equipment in the blacksmith shop. After snapping a few photos in the Village, we headed toward the property entrance to meet our driver for the backroads bus tour.

 Our Backroads Bus Tour Excursion

While the animals may have been the highlight for my nephew, the bus tour was my favorite part of the visit! Our tour guide was incredibly friendly and knowledgeable. She took us to parts of the county I had never seen before—and remember, I am Lancaster born and raised. We stopped at an Amish bakery along the way as well as a small Amish farm that sold handmade crafts and homemade snacks. I couldn’t resist a pint of fresh-squeezed lemonade for the ride. It was delish! We saw children riding through cornfields on carts pulled by miniature ponies, we passed buggies, and we drove through the rolling hills of Lancaster County’s countryside for about 90 minutes. It was quite picturesque, and everyone on the tour thoroughly enjoyed the experience. NOTE: The backroads bus tour is not recommended for children under five.

After we arrived back at the Amish Village, Silas and I decided to take one last look around the grounds. It was neat to see what an Amish schoolhouse looks like from the inside—Silas was very intrigued by the reading and math exercises displayed on the chalkboard. We made sure to check out the water wheel during our visit as well. Did you know that even today most Amish farms use a water wheel and windmill to operate a pump that provides water to animals in the barn? Fascinating stuff!

Planning Your Visit to the Amish Village

If you’d like to experience an authentic Amish property, Silas and I recommend visiting the Amish Village. It’s a great place for both kids and adults to learn in a fun, hands-on environment. They even offer a 25-minute farmhouse tour in addition to the bus tour we were on. You can find all of their tour package information and rates on the Amish Village website. Experience how the Pennsylvania Amish really live today!

Emily Long is a Lancaster County native, singer/songwriter, and all around music lover. She is an Online PR Specialist and, on the side, works at her family’s business, Long’s Horseradish, at Lancaster Central Market. To learn more about Emily, visit her website: www.EmilyLongMusic.com.

Emily Long is a Lancaster County native, singer/songwriter, and all around music lover. She is an Online PR Specialist and, on the side, works at her family’s business, Long’s Horseradish, at Lancaster Central Market. To learn more about Emily, visit her website: www.EmilyLongMusic.com. – See more at: http://padutchcountryblog.com/pedal-preserve-lancaster-county-farms/#sthash.yrgaTAWZ.dpuf
Emily Long is a Lancaster County native, singer/songwriter, and all around music lover. She is an Online PR Specialist and, on the side, works at her family’s business, Long’s Horseradish, at Lancaster Central Market. To learn more about Emily, visit her website: www.EmilyLongMusic.com. – See more at: http://padutchcountryblog.com/pedal-preserve-lancaster-county-farms/#sthash.yrgaTAWZ.dpuf

Horses and a Ranch – a brides dream wedding

I grew up riding horses, living and breathing horses, obsessing over horses. So when I was asked to tour the grounds of Ironstone Ranch, I thought, HECK YES! Perhaps I could get some “horse time” in Lancaster, something I have been dying for since I moved here. Little did I know I’d have that opportunity in Elizabethtown, a place I had been only once before.

The long stone driveway was intimidating at first. I was unsure of whether I was in the right place, passing from a town center surrounded by businesses and winding my way down a long, secluded drive. But then I saw it. I was first greeted with a beautiful green and off-white barn, a picturesque farmhouse, and two Texas Longhorns peeking over the fence in the front pasture. I hadn’t expected to see such a beautiful property. I guess I had mainly been focused on the potential for taking a trail ride in the woods.

Mark, the ranch manager, greeted me with a warm and friendly manner, a horseman by passion and training; we talked about his life before the Ranch. Mark had trained a special team of horses to provide the opportunity for special needs children to ride therapeutically. In fact, this was the connection that brought him to Ironstone, having met the owners of Ironstone, the Abel family, while working with their first adopted daughter, Brittany. Brittany was the inspiration for Brittany’s Hope Foundation, “a non-profit 501 (c) 3 foundation dedicated to aiding and facilitating adoptions of special needs children from around the world.” All profits from Ironstone Ranch go directly to Brittany’s Hope Foundation. “Events With A Purpose” has become the tagline of the Ranch, embodying the spirit of having a greater benefit to offer the world at large than just a wedding venue or a trail ride. I found that to be a pretty good reason to plan any type of event there.

As we toured the grounds, I imagined what it would be like to be a bride on the search for the perfect venue. Mark walked me through the entire process, from start to finish, no detail left untold. He has actually thought of everything, and I don’t say that lightly. From the details of the bride quarters, including places to hang your dresses, a vanity hidden behind a dry goods display for the day-of primping needs, to the entrance the bride will make in a white, horse-drawn carriage, he’s literally thought of it all.

You can be wed under a gazebo in the orchard, or if it suits you better, in the mini barn with a picture window looking over the fields and 275 acre property. After the ceremony, the newlyweds are whisked away in their marriage carriage, the wedding party following in a horse-drawn carriage of their own. Both carriages make their way down a trail through the woods, following an old railroad that once carried Lincoln’s body during his funeral procession. Large stone walls, intimate groves of tall trees, wide open fields, I couldn’t count on all my fingers and toes, over and over, how many places existed for beautiful photos on this one trail.

Now you may ask, well what do the guests do while the married couple and wedding party are off exploring? Mark’s thought of that too. Cocktail hour by the barn, lawn games to be played, Banjo and Sweet Tea the miniature donkeys are there for a pet, a fire pit for those more inclined towards a quiet moment, and don’t forget and orchard and ranch to explore. All your guests will want not, that’s for sure.

The reception seems like it would be no less spectacular, with carriages unloading the newlyweds and their wedding party in front of the large barn where their guests are anxiously awaiting their entrance. Cue the large barn doors that open to reveal the bridal party and groomsmen, followed by the newly married couple. The stage is a large, restored barn, the wooden structure itself providing a beautiful environment. New and old rustic touches are on display: an old carriage, whiskey barrels and worn hutches. A bar is constructed of reclaimed wood and the ceiling of the barn strung with beautiful lights. Each piece of this beautiful picture placed perfectly.

Mark walked me through the day, start to finish. I could imagine the groomsmen hanging out in the stables of the mini barn, relaxing before the next event. I could imagine taking my bridesmaids on a trail ride the day before, spending the evening in the old farmhouse, enjoying my last moments of singledom. I could imagine bouncing around in a white, horse-drawn carriage down a winding trail. I could imagine how this could be the perfect place for some, with a beautiful mission that inspires “Events with a Purpose.”

Now you may be asking, did you get to actually ride any horses while you were there? The answer is no, but I was welcomed back, whether I was a potential bride or not.

I’m ready for some “horse time!”

Jocelyn Park moved to Lancaster in 2012 from Media, PA. Having traveled to various cities around the world, this one felt more like home than ever. When not planning creative events and blogging for Transplant, Jocelyn is a freelance graphic designer throwing good vibes and design out into the world around her.  www.jocelynpark.com | lancastertransplant.com

 

Our enchanting overnight stay

I wanted to take my husband on a local overnight getaway for his birthday. I was envisioning a relaxing, carefree, and welcoming environment. I got just that when we stayed at the Australian Walkabout Inn Bed and Breakfast.

When I booked our stay, I spoke with Lynne. She could not have been nicer. Lynne and Bob are the Innkeepers and are especially gifted at making their guests feel like family. I was impressed with her ability to be professional yet warm. I booked our stay in the Outback Cottage because it had a private hot tub. I also booked a couples relaxation massage.

When my husband and I arrived, we were greeted by Bob. He explained that he was taking another couple to their room and he would be with us shortly. We walked into the front door to wait for Bob. When we entered, Matt and I were impressed with the decorations. They were done with great detail and thought. It was obvious that the innkeepers wanted their place to feel like home but also elegant. We had made our way into the sitting room to wait for Bob. Only a short time later, he arrived. He offered us coffee and began explaining where the massage would take place, what time breakfast would be starting, and gave us our room key. He then led the way to the Outback Cottage.

When we opened the door to the cottage, I was struck with how lovely it was. Immediately we saw a fire place, a Keurig, and a private hot tub – score! But the best part of the room was the completely inviting king-sized bed.

A short time later we were to arrive for our massages. We went into the main house and walked up the stairs to the third floor. The massage therapists were there waiting for us. The room was very relaxing. We were ready to put our cares and worries behind us for just one hour. The massage therapists did a great job by relaxing us and we felt so comfortable in their care. Once the massage was over, we went out to dinner and then arrived back at our room.

We turned on some music, along with the fire place, and got in the hot tub. It was so nice that I tried to coax my husband into redoing our bedroom to model this one. He didn’t budge. We then went to bed and we both slept like babies because of how relaxed we were from the massage, hot tub, comfortable bed, and perfect room temperature.

In the morning we took our time getting up, made some coffee, and then got ready. We painfully said goodbye to the best room we have ever stayed in. We walked into the main house and were greeted by other guests as we waited for breakfast. The other guests were quite pleasant and very interesting to talk to. We all went into the dining room and sat down at the two large dining room tables. The tables were decorated in a charming way and I was eagerly anticipating what lovely food we might be served. I had previously discussed with Lynne that I must eat gluten free foods and am very sensitive to even the smallest amount of gluten touching my food. She said it would not be a problem. I was anticipating that we would have eggs, bacon, etc. for breakfast so, imagine my surprise when Lynne brought out a piping hot baked oatmeal dish. It was so delicious – I could have eaten the whole batch!

We had a wonderful experience and could have easily stayed there for a week. My husband and I both decided that every year for our anniversary, we will stay at the Australian Walkabout Inn and request the Outback Cottage. It was an absolutely enchanting experience. One that I more than ready to repeat again!

Julie Iddings grew up in Lancaster County. She continues to be charmed by the quaintness of the small towns and villages of Lancaster, but also the artistic and thriving Downtown. Julie resides in Marietta with her family.

Free Lancaster County Travel Planning Guide

Get our free Getaway Guide

View the Guide online or have it mailed to you

Get It

Receive our Email Newsletter

Subscribe to receive the latest news, events, deals & more

Sign Up