Tag Archives: Kauffman’s Fruit Farm and Market

Iconic Desserts of Lancaster

With National Dessert Day on October 14, and let’s be honest – every day when your sweet tooth strikes – we’ve gathered our favorite desserts that have roots in Lancaster. Whether you’re roaming around Central Market, or venturing to bakeries in our small towns, you’re sure to stumble upon these sweet treats that capture the comforts of the county.

Whoopie Pies

A favorite for locals and visitors alike, the whoopie pie is a classic PA Dutch treat. Legend has it that whoopie pies were first made from leftover cake batter, and those who found this treat in their lunch pails would shout “whoopie!” – Hence the name.

This treat is made from two cake-like cookies with cream in the center. The traditional chocolate cake with vanilla cream version is still quite popular, with new tasty variations debuting over the years.

Where to find them: Hershey Farms Restaurant in Strasburg, Shady Maple in East Earl, and Bird-in-Hand Bakery & Café in Bird-in-Hand

Shoo-Fly Pie

Me oh my – it’s shoo-fly pie! This fluffy molasses dessert is a Lancaster tradition that got its name because the molasses attracts flies. As the pie cools on the window sill, you’d constantly be shooing the flies away.

Two versions of this pie can be found around the county – wet bottom and dry bottom. The wet bottom version is cake-like on top with a gooey custard consistency underneath. If you prefer a cake-like consistency through-out, opt for the dry bottom version.

Where to find it: Dutch Haven in Ronks, Good ‘N Plenty in Smoketown, and Bird-in-Hand Bake Shop in Bird-in-Hand

Ice Cream

Not only is Lancaster home to Turkey Hill Dairy, who has been churning up ice cream since 1980, it’s also home to a plethora of small business whipping up artisan ice cream made with local dairy products.

Whether in a cup, a cone, or blended into a milkshake, ice cream is a tasty treat year round. Find unique flavors like Chai Stroopie at Lancaster Sweet Shoppe or Pumpkin Pie at Bird-in-Hand Bakery & Café.

Where to find it: Fox Meadows Creamery in Ephrata, Lapp Valley Farm in New Holland, Strasburg Country Store & Creamery in Strasburg (in addition to the two mentioned above)

Apple Dumplings

Just in time for fall, this local favorite combines orchard-fresh fruit and rich, buttery pastry dough. Apple Dumplings begin popping up on bakery menus especially when the apple harvest is at its peak.

Simplicity is key with this dessert. Cored apples are wrapped in a simple, butter pastry dough then baked with cinnamon, brown sugar, and of course, more butter, and served either alone or ala mode.

Where to find them: Kauffman’s Fruit Farm in Bird-in-Hand, Byer’s Butterflake Bakery in Leola, and Zig’s Bakery at Central Market and in Lititz

Kauffman’s Famous Fruit Farm & Market

Kauffman’s Fruit Farm & Market has been family-owned and operated since the founder, Amos L. (A.L.) Kauffman planted the first fruit trees in 1911. Today, over 100 years later, the 3rd, 4th, and 5th generations run the business; and the orchards are now producing over 135 varieties of tree fruits on 100 acres. Pretty impressive!

When A.L. built a packing house in 1937, he made it larger than most other buildings in the area because he believed that his business would expand exponentially. He had dreams of growing the best tasting fruit in the region and building a successful business that would continue on for generations.

In 1954, a critical part of his vision was fulfilled when his five sons became business partners. A. L. Kauffman & Sons began a new chapter.

In A.L.’s lifetime alone, the orchard grew to have 55 acres of apples, 35 acres of peaches, 3 acres of pears, and 4 acres of plums and cherries.

For the Kauffman family, hard work, skill-perfecting, family traditions, and fond memories have marked every milestone, every season, and every year of their growing business. Picking apples in the orchard, making cider, assisting in the farm market, and managing a growing business have all been key to the family’s success.

While they are thankful for their rich history, strong values, and meaningful traditions, they continue to grow and adapt to the needs of their customers. They proudly combine values of the past with visions for the future.

Because the Kauffman family loves their business, the local community, and each customer, they promise to continue growing food responsibly, sustainably, and healthfully for many more generations.

Image Courtesy of Kauffman's Fruit Farm

Image Courtesy of Kauffman’s Fruit Farm

To learn more about the market and Kauffman’s delicious produce, read Christina’s post.

Learn more about the Kauffman family or purchase their 100th-anniversary keepsake book, FAITH, FAMILY & FRUIT.

Be sure to check out other iconic Lancaster County hot-spots such as Shady Maple Smorgasbord, Strasburg Rail Road, and Lancaster Central Market, and Green Dragon.

Take home Lancaster’s farm fresh produce

There’s nothing like the crisp, juicy, delicious crunch of a fresh apple, right from the farm.  It’s not the same as an ordinary grocery store apple – there’s still a touch of warm cinnamon sun and sweet fresh air in that bite that makes that ripe apple extra special. This is what draws locals and visitors alike to Kauffman’s Fruit Farm and Market. This quaint farmer’s market is the perfect place to find a fantastic selection of farm-fresh fruits and vegetables, as well as a variety of locally produced dry goods such as flour, oats, baking goods, and more. Not to mention fresh meats, cheeses, and pies. Kauffman’s is also known, locally and nationally, for their fresh apple cider.

Just inside the door, a display of live honeybees captivates visitors, young and old alike. My eyes wander to the colorful straws filled with fresh, amber honey, and I remember visiting the Topsfield fair (In Topsfield, MA) as a child. My parents would always spoil us with a fresh honey-straw treat. With this fond memory, I smile and turn my attention to the apples and other fresh fruits which are displayed in delightful wicker baskets. Courtlands, Honeycrisps, and Galas; types of apples that make you want to run home and instantly bake some warm apple desserts.  Continuing through the aisles, the aroma of flour and spices remind me of my grandmother’s kitchen.

At the far end of the market is a deli with a selection of sausage, chicken, steaks, and other fresh items. Right next to the deli counter is a mysterious wooden vault-like door, which immediately piqued my interest. I inquired about the thick wooden door, and learned that it is a deep freezer which will chill fresh foods in record time, therefore preserving flavors and freshness that might otherwise be lost. To me, it looked like the secret door to Narnia (a favorite book from childhood) and, if the door is opened under just the right circumstances – my imagination believes there will be snow and fresh pine limbs there to greet the unsuspecting employee.  Another reminiscent smile.

I decided to make one more round of the market to make sure I didn’t miss anything, and this time I noticed the delivery bay at the back of the store where all the fresh fruits arrive.  A collage of bright stickers decorated the wall behind a counter – remnants of sales of apples from seasons past while a cheerful young Amish girl straightened baskets for new deliveries to come.

Before I left, I took a few minutes to sit on the wooden bench in front of the store and just watch the world go by. Several Amish buggies clip-clopped down the road, customers came and went, and on the horizon a few cows grazed happily on the fresh June grass.  The warm sun and blue sky reassured me that summer had arrived to stay. Times and places like these allow you to truly appreciate all the things and all the moments that make life great.

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